baumzaehlen - Primeval Forests & Their Trees

©2017copyright christoph hase

Tresticklan National Park, Sweden

 

The park (29 km2) is the largest roadless tract in southern Sweden1 and one of the largest, if not the very largest, tracts of almost undisturbed forest in southern Scandinavia. Although the park is relatively small, it has a strong feeling of wilderness. Large areas of the park’s forests originate from a forest fire in the 1830s 2.

 

Elevations range from 165 to 275 m. The landscape consists of north–south orientated fissure valleys. The ridges and upper slopes are covered by dry, low and open Opens internal link in current windowPinus sylvestris (Scots pine) forest. On the lower slopes and valley bottoms there are mesic and moist, relatively low Opens internal link in current windowPicea abies (Norway spruce) forest, bogs and small beautiful lakes. The soils are relatively poor in general. Although the park is located close to the northern boundary of the temperate broadleaf forests, its trees are restricted to few boreal species; in addition to those already mentioned, Opens internal link in current windowBetula pendula (silver birch) is abundant, too. Opens internal link in current windowB. pubescens (downy birch) grows on moist and wet sites. You may have difficulties distinguishing between the two Betula species but other species are very easy to identify. Annual precipitation is approx. 790 mm and average annual temperature 5–6°C.

 

Off-trail hiking is easy in a north–south direction but slow west–east due to the valley system; some slopes are steep, although low. Camping is allowed throughout the park.

 

References:

 

1       http://sverigesnationalparker.se

2       www.lansstyrelsen.se/vastragotaland/SiteCollectionDocuments/Sv/djur-och-natur/skyddad-natur/nationalparker/Tresticklan2008webb.pdf

 

Official site:

 

sverigesnationalparker.se/en/choose-park---list/tresticklan-national-park/

 

Dry Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine) forest. Also Picea abies (Norway spruce, with dark foliage, background) and Betula pendula (silver birch, light green foliage, right).
Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine, large trunks), Picea abies (Norway spruce, dark foliage) and Betula pendula (silver birch, with white trunk and light green foliage).
Bottom of a low valley with Picea abies (Norway spruce) and Populus tremula (common aspen, centre).
Picea abies (Norway spruce) mire on valley bottom.
Wetland at the shore of Halletjärn. Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine) and Betula pubescens (downy birch, white trunks).
Lake Tresticklan. Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine) and Betula pendula (silver birch, light green foliage).
Shore of a nameless small lake. Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine, reddish trunks), Picea abies (Norway spruce, with dark foliage) and Betula pendula (silver birch, left with light green foliage).
Tree-like 6.2-metre Juniperus communis (common juniper) in Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine) forest.
Sorbus aucuparia (European rowan) leaf flush.