baumzaehlen - Primeval Forests & Their Trees

©2017copyright christoph hase

Sequoia National Park, California, USA

 

Sequoia and Opens internal link in current windowKings Canyon national parks together form a protected area of 3500 km2. Additionally, there are several protected wilderness areas adjacent to the parks. Excluding some specific areas (like Giant Forest), dispersed camping is allowed.

 

One of the best known and most exceptional places in the park is Giant Forest at approx. 2000 metres on the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada. The largest Opens internal link in current windowSequoiadendron giganteum (giant sequoia) and many of the other very largest individuals are located there1, as are also many named dense Sequoiadendron groups. The giant size, the gnarled, glowing orange-red bark and the perfect cypress-like crown of the younger trees make S. giganteum a truly fascinating species. Even its cone is a work of art. The other most important tree species are Opens internal link in current windowAbies lowiana (California white fir), Opens internal link in current windowAbies magnifica (red fir), Opens internal link in current windowPinus lambertiana (sugar pine) and Opens internal link in current windowPinus jeffreyi (Jeffrey pine). Annual precipitation in Giant Forest is 1100 mm and average annual temperature 8.1°C 2. Summers are very dry and precipitation is almost exclusively in the form of winter snow.

 

These forests have been enormously stressed during recent years, which have been exceptionally dry and warm. It is feared that global warming might even result in the extinction of Sequoiadendron from its native range without rescue measures.3

 

References:

 

1       Opens external link in new windowThe Largest Giant Sequoias by Trunk Volume. National Park Service.

2       Van Pelt & Franklin (2000): Opens external link in new windowInfluence of canopy structure on the understory environment in tall, old-growth, conifer forests. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 30, 1231-1245.

3       http://www.visaliatimesdelta.com/story/news/local/2015/07/05/will-need-rescue-sequoias/29744143/

 

Official site:

 

http://www.nps.gov/seki


Group of Sequoiadendron giganteum (giant sequoia) called "The Cloister" in Giant Forest.
Senate Group, Giant Forest. Sequoiadendron giganteum (giant sequoia).
President Tree, the second largest Sequoiadendron giganteum (giant sequoia, 1278 cubic metres). Also Pinus lambertiana (sugar pine), young tree, right, and Abies lowiana (California white fir), right background and left. Giant Forest.
Burned Sequoiadendron giganteum (giant sequoia) log and partly burned Abies lowiana (California white fir) forest. Giant Forest.
Vista from Moro Rock to the east. Pinus lambertiana (sugar pine), trees with long horizontal branches; Abies lowiana (California white fir) and Abies magnifica (red fir), narrow crowns.
Giant Forest canopy. Sequoiadendron giganteum (giant sequoia), large hemispherical crowns; Abies lowiana (California white fir) and Abies magnifica (red fir), narrow crowns; Pinus lambertiana (sugar pine), trees with long horizontal branches.
Pinus jeffreyi (Jeffrey pine).