baumzaehlen - Primeval Forests & Their Trees

©2017copyright christoph hase

Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, British Columbia, Canada

 

This park comprises a narrow strip (290 km2) of temperate rainforest on the Pacific coast. The park falls into three parts: The northernmost Long Beach Unit has a few day hikes, the middle one is composed of a number of the islands of Barkley Sound, while the well-known backpacking route West Coast Trail runs through the southernmost unit. If you want to enjoy this  trail as a great wilderness experience be careful not to look inland, because the park is so narrow that in many places clearcut is visible between the trees. About midway, the park area widens inland to form the Nitinat Triangle, while a little further south Opens internal link in current windowCarmanah Walbran Provincial Park adjoins this park.

 

The most important tall tree species are Opens internal link in current windowThuja plicata (western redcedar), Opens internal link in current windowTsuga heterophylla (western hemlock), Opens internal link in current windowAbies amabilis (pacific silver fir) and Opens internal link in current windowPicea sitchensis (Sitka spruce). Tree species diversity is low and most species are easy to identify. The largest tree of Canada by volume, T. plicata tree called Cheewhat Lake Cedar (449 m3), grows here1. Annual precipitation is 2000–3200 mm and average annual temperature approx. 9.5°C. Precipitation is very high from late autumn to early spring; summers are drier (rainfall from June to August 150–300 mm).

 

References:

 

1        Van Pelt, R. (2001): Forest Giants of the Pacific Coast. Global Forest Society.

 

Official site:

 

http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/bc/pacificrim/index.aspx

 

Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) coastal forest, Wickaninnish Trail, Long Beach Unit.
Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce), West Coast Trail.
Thuja plicata (western redcedar), Rainforest Trail, Long Beach Unit, with Tsuga heterophylla (western hemlock) centre background.